Strength Endurance

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Time To Put Your Stone on The Mountain . . .

I don’t like animated films.

But last night, me and the family watched the soon to be Disney classic called Moana.

It’s about a brave little girl named Moana who was chosen by the sea to travel far, fight great spirits and ultimately save her families Island.

And when Moana was old enough, her father knew the time had come.

So he gave her . . .  “The Talk”.

And he took her on a far journey to the tallest mountain top.

They climbed for what seemed like hours.

And when both reached the peak, he showed her a tower of stone slabs stacked as high as a palm tree.

Each stone placed by each of the fittest tribal leaders going back five hundred years.

And that’s when father told Moana.

“Moana, it’s Time To Put Your Stone On The Mountain.”

And Moana knew what he was saying.

Because she had the drive to be strong.

To have powerful shoulders and arms.

A grip that could crush a coconut.

And the wind in her legs that can take her miles faster than the eagle can fly.

And with Heavy Hands, this can be your truth.

It’s your turn to place your stone on the mountain.

Heavy Hands® is a tool.

It’s one you can use to get in the best shape of your life.

One you can build your upper body and aerobic conditioning.

And one that is essentially a time multiplier for burning fat.

It’s up to you what you do with them.

Michael Senoff

http://www.WeightedHands.com

Makers of Heavy Hands Weights, Grips & Gear

Heavy Hands® / Weighted Hands® and are the registered trademarks of Michael Senoff.

All rights reserved

Out Power, Out Last, Out Grip Story . . .

This is baaaaaad aaaass

It’s a story about the results one ordinary man gained by including Heavyhands as part of his training routine.

——

Hi Michael,

Just dropping you a quick note.

I’m 40 and I train in martial arts 2x per week and you can guess, I’m the oldest.

I have been hanging with all the 20 year old kids fairly easy

(I was former Marine – so still in decent shape).

I want to share some of the results I’ve been getting with the Heavy Hands.

The Heavyhands is really changing my jiu-jitsu game.

First off, I’m getting multiple results from my 3-4 days per week of Heavy Hands.

First and foremost my strength and conditioning is now so far beyond others I train with and it’s amazing.

My arms and grip feel like they have endless energy and strength with lungs the size of beach balls!

I know this will sound sort of strange to some readers, but until you get into it and it hits you it probably won’t make a lick of sense!

I have two measurements that I have use to judge the effectiveness of the Heavyhands exercises.

They are BJJ/grappling and the riding a Schwinn Airdyne stationary bike.

I know the Airdyne one will have your readers scratching their heads but I will explain shortly after I discuss the most important for me, my grappling conditioning.

As anyone who has done BJJ or any type of hard grappling will tell you arm and forearm/grip fatigue is a killer when grappling.

Once your shoulders, arms, and especially your forearms get fatigued you can’t hand fight or grip anything.

Most people have heard that BJJ is not about strength, but technique and leverage, which is true, it is the base.

But let me assure you one must be strong and conditioned to go all out in a roll after roll after roll training.

If you can’t hand fight or get grips, you’re swimming with the sharks and bleeding like a stuck pig.

At my age of 40, I have to have something in my back pocket to keep me on the mat with all the 20 year old guys I train with, and that’s Heavyhands.

Over the past 2 weeks I have seen unreal improvements in my grip strength and endurance.

This past Tuesday I put in 3 hard 15-20 minute rolls, I am talking about 90-100% rolls and my arms never failed me.

Actually it seemed that the longer I went the stronger I got.

Maybe it was my grip and pressure was weakening my training partners much quicker than before.

I was locking up crushing Kimura locks easily along with being able to forcefully dig my way into deep collar holds for chokes.

I felt like the shark for once and felt like I was taking them out into the deep water where there was no escaping my strength and conditioning.

My wind?

Never caught a hard breath and breathed through my nose most of the rolls.

Heavyhands has been so dramatic that the wife has even started Heavy handing it and now I have to share my heavy hands with the her since she’s seen the physical appearance improvements.

Here’s the deal on the Airdyne.

On the mornings she is Heavyhanding it, I am riding the airdyne.

Here’s something interesting I’ve found.

I used to able to ride at between 48-53 rpm to get into my heart rate zone and the riding wasn’t physically hard at all.

Now, for me to get into in my HR zone I am having to pedal at 58-63 rpm to just stay in the zone.

For me, riding at this pace for 30-45 minutes becomes agonizing.

My legs and arms burn like crazy and I look down at my HR monitor and I am humming along at 133-135 bpm.

If things keep going like this I’ll be riding at my old sprint speeds just to get into my aerobic zone.

Here is all I am going to say about my appearance.

I am much more vascular than I have ever been, and let me tell you my arms are extremely vascular now.

I now have muscles being built that I never knew existed.

I am noticing a thickening around the inside of my elbow joints that I have never had before.

My BF is now at 12% and I have veins in my lower abs.

Here is the best thing of all, I am not “dieting” anymore.

The Heavy Hands are affecting my appetite just like you get from hard swimming.

I always became ravenous after swimming and no other activity produced that effect with me other than Heavy Hands.

It’s like I can’t get enough food now.

I used to get fat on 2100 calories per day and now I’d guess I am eating closer to 3000 give or take a few.

I can eat what I want now and eat until I am fully satisfied to nearly stuffed 3-4 times per day with no issues.

I’ll never have to diet again with Heavy Hands.

No more destroyed metabolism here!

PS. Us older guys can still be good, we just have to be patient and let our exercise programs do the work for us since we can’t roll hard 3-5x per week like the young guys.

Thanks again for the great info on a great system.

Jeffery Roark

Decade Old Questions Answered On Heavyhands . . .

This is cool.

I found an interesting Q&A exchange with the inventor and developer of Heavyhands and a long time Heavyhander in the archives of an old Heavyhands blog run by the old distributor of Heavyhands.

This was at a time, over a decade ago, when Heavyhands was poised for a comeback into the mainstream of America.

Here is the question . . .

Hello, and Happy New Year to all

I am a retired pathologist living in Cape Town, South Africa

Len Schwartz has been an inspirational eminence in my life since 1984 when I was 38 years old. A moderately good but rather heavily built recreational runner (10k in 34:15; marathon 2:50; 170+lbs at 5’10)

I happened upon the first HH book in a local bookstore in Upstate NY and the B&W photos of the 57 year old were an epiphany.

That was the kind of body I wanted to have

The exercise physiology expounded seemed plausible.

I bought and experimented with a selection of generic dumbbells 1-15 lbs.

And quickly I made great improvements in my upper body endurance and strength.

Before I could test whether the enhanced muscularity of upper body was detrimental to my running, I tore a meniscus in my knee playing racquetball.

This was in the early days of arthroscopic surgery.

I couldn’t run for over 12 years without knee pain.

But I kept up religiously with HH walking medleys with lots of double ski poll exercises in particular

I, too, rarely ever saw anyone else doing Heavyhands right!

At age 50, I gingerly started running again as my knee pain seemed under control and entered some 5ks/

Interestingly, my age adjusted running times were several notches higher than almost a decade and a half earlier.

I was matching and often easily beating my erstwhile nemeses who had continued running and training hard all the while.

Now retired, I have recently taken up competitive race walking, a very challenging sport, but one far more suited to my (panaerobically conditioned) physiognomy.

Whereas I was an 84% level 53 year old runner (national class), I am a 90% level race walker at 57 (3k in 14:00 in judged competition – world class for age)

Clearly, quite consistent intense training with HH over 15 years has in my case been crucial in mitigating the usual or expected age related decline in aerobic capacity.

Aerobically trained upper extremities are a definite advantage in race walking (as predicted by Leonard Schwartz in his walking book)

A few questions for LS (I have many):

Len, would you say your originally rather heterodox ideas have now entered the mainstream in exercise physiology circles, or are there still doubters?

What was your (amazing) combined VO2 max of ~ 80 at age 57 estimated at?

What has been your personal experience with respect to VO2 Max decline in your 60s and 70s

What about your % BF and MHR/RP?

How recent is the great looking color photo on the HH website?

NF

—————

Answers

Monday, January 05, 2004

Responses to the questions posed by N.F. from Len Schwartz

N.F.: Would you say your originally rather heterodox ideas have now entered the mainstream in exercise physiology circles, or are there still doubters?

Schwartz. My guess is that the infiltration is both spotty and iffy! It appears that this ‘heterodoxy’ has been either bypassed or over a short time frame-adopted as the only way to go. This feast or famine quality may have to do with the fact that Long strength hasn’t really been presented to the public so that men and women would get involved. Same applies in physiologic circles. It appears that the folks at the University of Pittsburgh are eager to reengage = Heavyhands (Panaerobics-Longstrength) research. There are many interesting pockets of doubt, just as in all the basic areas of fitness/exercise research, but that’s where the fun lies!

N.F. Why was your (amazing) combined VO2 max of ~ 80 at age 57 estimated?

L.S. As I recall, we had measured my 02 pulse at various levels of continuous intensity earlier. That made it feasible for me to estimate V02s by merely pulse counting. With later direct measurements (many) this level was reaffirmed. I remember one level of 70 ml/kilo/min-1 was directly measured at a pulse of less than 120/bpm! A famous U.S. physiologist, looking at my findings was prepared to say that was indeed a most high test! Actually, given the likelihood of the reentrance of genetic and technical issues I make much less fuss about V02’s. We do what we can, period! More important, I think are those sub maximal V02s which is where the work of exercise is accomplished!

N.F. What has been your personal experience with respect to VO2 Max decline in your 60s and 70s

Schwartz. Surprisingly little, if any decline. A couple of years ago I did walk ‘n’ pump treadmill test that appeared to be as high or higher than that direct test.  The literature indicates that there is a fall off in performance among aging, regular, aerobic type athletes. I do believe that eventually Long strength type athletes will record some of the highest sub maximal performances. These could well be accomplished by athletes who handle heavy weights while doing  comparatively many repetitions (perhaps a thousand or more), within the aerobic sphere. The work of Pavel Tsatsuline at Dragondoor is fascinating in this respect.

N.F. What about your % BF and MHR/RP?

Schwartz. Perhaps 3-5% at my petite 130lbs! Resting pulse 40-50.

N.F. How recent is the great looking color photo on the HH website?

Schwartz. Pretty recent, within 5 years.

To read more original post of Heavyhanders and answers from Dr. Lenard Schwartz,

go to. There is some great history here to be discovered here.

Enjoy

http://heavyhands.blogspot.com/2004_01_01_archive.html

Muhammad Ali Story . . .

The greatest

A colleague of mine was at a talk given by Angelo Dundee, one of the great boxing trainers in the history of America.

Then, following his own advice after the talk, he started asking questions, and he asked Dundee, “Who is the hardest-working athlete you ever trained?”

He didn’t say the best.

He said the hardest-working.

Dundee said, “Oh, that’s easy.

Muhammad Ali.

Muhammad Ali was head and shoulders above everybody else in work ethic.”

My friend knew Ali was great, but he didn’t know he was that hard of a worker.

That got him motivated to start reading biographies of Ali.

And he found this quote from Muhammad Ali.

He said . .

“I hated every minute of training, but I said to myself, ‘Don’t quit. Suffer now, and I could spend the rest of my life as a champion.’”

‘Don’t quit.

SUFFER now, and I could spend the rest of my life as a champion.’”

Heavy Hands are a tool.

It’s one you can use to get in the best shape of your life.

One you can build you upper body and aerobic conditioning.

And one that is essentially a time multiplier for burning fat.

It’s up to you what you do with them.

Reply back if you want more Heavy Hands add-on weights or ergo grips and let me know what you want and I’ll send a PayPal invoice.

You can pay with a credit card and you DO NOT need a PayPal account.

Feel free to call or text to 858-692-9461.

To Avoid Ordering The Wrong Weight It’s Important You Read This Below.

All older model AMF and Lion Sports Heavy Hands weights will twist on to our new ergonomic grips

All weighted hands ® weights are designed to fit your older AMF Heavy Hands handles regardless of the foam grip color.

Your older Heavy Hands handles weigh a total of 1 lb. each without any twist on weights.

The new Weighted Hands ergonomic grip handles weigh 1 1/2 each.

To calculate your total weight in each hand add the handle weight + weight X 2 = Your total weight in each hand.

If you own the older Heavy Hands weights with the number on each weight, that number represents your total weight in each hand (Handle + weight x 2 = total weight in each hand)

Now get out and get ripped!

Michael Senoff

http://www.WeightedHands.com

Makers of Heavy Hands® Weights, Grips & Gear

Heavy Hands® / Weighted Hands® and are the registered trademarks of Michael Senoff.

All rights reserved

The Last Event . . .

Traditionally

The last event before the closing ceremonies of the Olympics is the Men’s Marathon, which ends in the Olympic stadium.

The 1968 Marathon had been over for 2 hours.

Cameramen break down equipment and sportswriters finish stories.

Somebody yells, “Look! Look! Look!”

One last runner hobbles into the stadium.

Painstakingly, he circles the Olympic oval, crosses the finish line, drops to his knees, and kisses the ground.

Sportswriters and videographers crowd around him.

They ask, “Who are you?”

“John Stephen Akhwari,” he replies.

“Where are you from?”

He says, “I am from the country, Tanzania.”

They press on, “The race ended over 2 hours ago.

Why are you still running?”

He replies,

“My country sent me 5000 miles to run in the Olympic Marathon, not to stop the race.

They sent me to finish the race.”

Don’t Quit.

Heavy Hands are a tool.

It’s one you can use to get in the best shape of your life.

One you can build you upper body and aerobic conditioning.

And one that is essentially a time multiplier for burning fat.

It’s up to you what you do with them.

Reply back if you want more Heavy Hands add-on weights or ergo grips and let me know what you want and I’ll send a PayPal invoice.

You can pay with a credit card and you DO NOT need a PayPal account.

Feel free to call or text to 858-692-9461.

To Avoid Ordering The Wrong Weight It’s Important You Read This Below.

All older model AMF and Lion Sports Heavy Hands weights will twist on to our new ergonomic grips

All weighted hands ® weights are designed to fit your older AMF Heavy Hands handles regardless of the foam grip color.

Your older Heavy Hands handles weigh a total of 1 lb. each without any twist on weights.

The new Weighted Hands ergonomic grip handles weigh 1 1/2 each.

To calculate your total weight in each hand add the handle weight + weight X 2 = Your total weight in each hand.

If you own the older Heavy Hands weights with the number on each weight, that number represents your total weight in each hand (Handle + weight x 2 = total weight in each hand)

Now get out and get ripped!

Michael Senoff

http://www.WeightedHands.com

Makers of Heavy Hands® Weights, Grips & Gear

Heavy Hands® / Weighted Hands® and are the registered trademarks of Michael Senoff.

All rights reserved

Hurt Pain Agony . . .

Mark Spitz, who in 1972 won 6 Olympic gold medals went to Indiana University.

And his coach was a guy named Doc Counsilman, the greatest swim coach in America’s history.

The first day of practice every fall, Councilman would get all the guys on the swim team to go out on the swim deck.

And there was a little banner that hung over the pool.

And the banner only had three words on it.

Hurt

Pain

Agony

Doc said, “Okay guys, we’re going to spend a lot of time together this year, and if you want to be a part of this swim team, every afternoon, you have to come here for a couple of hours and swim until you hurt.

But if you have higher goals and you want to be an NCA champ, you want to be a national champ; you have to come here every afternoon and swim until you’re in pain.”

“If you have still higher goals and you want to be the next Mark Spitz, you want to be a world champion or an Olympic champion, you have to come here and train until you’re in agony.” He said, “So it’s your choice.

Hurt, pain, agony.”

He said, “All of you, I wouldn’t have recruited you unless I knew each and every one of you had world class potential inside of you.”

Here’s the interesting thing.

Whether you choose to hurt or pain or agony, by the time you take a shower and go to dinner, everything is going to go back to normal, so it’s how much are you willing to give in that 2, 2-1/2 hours every day that’s going to determine your destiny.

What’s it going to be?

Hurt

Pain

Or Agony?

Fortunately, walking with Heavy Hands does not have to hurt.

You can do it and not feel pain.

And certainly, if you’re in agony, something is wrong.

Here’s why.

Walking with Heavy Hand is different that two limb exercises like biking, running or skating.

It’s kind of hard to explain, but a using your arms and legs together feel easier than exercising with just your legs alone.

It’s something you’ll notice right off the bat when you start with Heavy Hands.

Michael Senoff

Founder and CEO

http://www.WeightedHands.com

What Exercise To Do After A Knee Injury . . .

Don’t let a knee injury keep you down.

Learn to modify your workout and stay athletic your entire life

Bob used to be an all-around athlete.

He did triathlons, was an avid skier, played tennis and golf.

Then he blew his knee out.

Fortunately, Bob has been working out with HeavyHands since the 1980s.

When he was younger, he says he used them to help him reach his peak athletic shape.

And now that he’s older with knee problems, he uses them to get a full-body workout while he’s walking – without pounding his knee or his back.

And in this audio, you’ll hear how HeavyHands can be a part of your workout throughout your life too – no matter what stage of the game you’re currently in.

You’ll Also Hear . . .

* A quick guide to how much the weights and handles weigh and how to run the calculations – so you always know how much you’re carrying

* The one workout Bob says has given him the most definition for his arms – it’s also good for cardio and a great way to lose weight too

* Why Bob says the new handles can help you get more of a workout in

Getting older doesn’t mean you have to be out of shape.

It just means you have to look for ways to modify your workout after injuries or arthritis.

And in this audio, you’ll hear how Bob uses HeavyHands to help him do that.

Press play on the audio interview below to hear the full story.

      Heavyhands_Bob_Interview

Is There A Place For Weighted Hands In Sports . . .

I’ve outlined a few benefits that Weighted Hands can offer armature and or pro athletes in a variety of sports.Football

* Increases grip strength
* Increase dexterity and coordination for ball handling and control
* Running backs and receivers can especially benefit
* Build strong cardio vascular systems
* Builds hand, wrist and arm strength
* Build more endurance for passing, running, blocking, defending and tackling
* Weighted Hands can be used for rehabilitation for injuries, including the arms and shoulders
* Low cost, low impact, portable for traveling.

Basketball

* Weighted Hands can improves dexterity and coordination for ball handling.
* Increases range of motion for more forceful shooting
* May help with shooting accuracy from the three point and free throw line
* Increases endurance in the upper body for better ball control, dribbling skills and player defense
* Can help train to jump higher and more powerfully
* Low cost, low impact, portable for traveling.

Golf

* Working with Weighted hands can maximizes club grip strength
* Build rotational force and driving power to hit the ball further
* Helps for more stabilization with your golf shot
* Improve overall control or swing and ball shot accuracy
* May aid in the pain relief and rehabilitation of golfer’s elbow, tendonitis and rotator cuff problems
* Low cost, low impact, portable for traveling.

Rehab & RSI (Repetitive Strain Injuries)

* Working with Weighted hands can aid in pain relief of the hand, wrist, arm and shoulders
* Pain and injury prevention trough strength building endurance
* Rehabilitation of carpal tunnel pain with specific exercises
* Help loosen joints to relieve pain of arthritis, tendonitis and tennis elbow
* Slow, progressive resistance with no impact
* Can help you recover from extensive surgeries
* Help to avoid you having to undergo a surgery
* Low cost, low impact, portable for traveling.

Baseball

* Develop grip strength
* Build a more powerful throwing and batting arm
* Increase swing range of motion
* Help rehab bad elbows from tendonitis of pitchers and outfielders.
* Increases coordination and dexterity
* Build better throwing accuracy and consistency.
* Low cost, low impact, portable for traveling.

Tennis

* Builds dexterity
* Increase ball hitting speed and power in forehands, serves and backhands.
* Develop greater range of motion
* Develop more pin-point accuracy and ball placement
* Increase aerobic endurance and conditioning
* Helps strengthen muscles throughout the entire arms and legs
* Help prevent injuries by building more strength
* Rehab from injuries including tennis elbow and tendonitis with minimal impact
* Low cost, low impact, portable for traveling.

These are just a few ideas of how Weighted Hands can better your game.

If you know anyone who is serious about their sport, pass this email over to me.

WE PROMISE RESULTS!

You’ll FEEL and LOOK stronger.

Results YOU can actually SEE in a mirror.

Results you can measure with a tape.

There’s no need to undress, no need for strenuous exercise, no need for expensive gym visits.

Now build the body you’ve always wanted in just minutes per day in the PRIVACY OF YOUR OWN HOME.

Weighted Hands can start you on the way to a magnificent lean body.

Yes, just thirty minutes a day for 14 days prepares your body for the massive change in your appearance about to take place.

PS. Try Weighted Hands for six weeks if you don’t see results we’ll give you your money back – GUARANTEED!

Financing options available –

Call/Text now 858-692-9461

Michael Senoff

Founder and CEO
http://www.WeightedHands.com

Try Weighted Hands for six weeks if you don’t see results we’ll give you your money back – GUARANTEED!

Financing options available –

Call/Text now 858-692-9461

Michael Senoff

Good Morning Dips

Good Morning Dips

goodmorningdip

Here’s an illustration of the “Good Morning Dip” by John McKean, a student of Dr. Len Schwartz and advocate of “Longstrength” training for weight lifters.

The “Good Morning” is another name for the “forward bend”… like that done when “touching your toes”.

A “Dip” is a “pushup” or “press up” on two parallel bars that allow the body to be suspended in mid air and lowered, then raised.

Most of us cannot do the “Dip” exercise aerobically! Even if we could, it would not mean Dr. Schwartz’ criteria of engaging multiple muscle groups at the same time to reduce the effort expended by any SINGLE group!

So Dr. Schwartz combined these two exercises into one… so that it would activate the chest, shoulders, arms, and lower back with each of these muscle groups offering support so the movement could be done for a long time!

The exercise is so are… nobody has made a video even!

If dipping bars are not available, people have been known to use home made dipping bars

Home made dipping bars courtesy “Back To Primal

b1d65-dipbars

You could also use the backs of two sturdy chairs. Others use “walkers” that people who are not stable enough to walk use to get around! You could even use the surface of a washing machine or kitchen counter or other elevated surface.  Adjusting the handles on a suspension trainer should work as well!

Whatever you choose to work out with, bend forward while letting your arms guide you down while under control. Using your back and arms, come erect again.  This exercise should allow your arms to do many more “pushups” (“press ups”) or “dips” than could otherwise be done because of the back involvement. At the same time, your lower back is getting the assistance of the arms. While this movement may not seem too taxing, done in sufficient number, it can quickly elevate the heart rate to gain or maintain the heart rate in one’s “training range” (see note below).

To add difficulty to the move, it can be done “on the toes” throughout the movement or end in a calf raise. More or less weight can be shifted to the chest and arms if one feels those body parts are being cheated and more shifted to the back later. One should always be conscious of involving the lower back in this movement, however, to help the back muscles remain strong and enduring in their own right!

Combined with the “Squat Pull” or “Squat Row”, “Good Morning Dips” may be the only two exercises needed for a complete “Longstrength” or “Panaerobic” workout… but we’ll discuss more exercises soon!

Note: Training range is determined by this formula : [220 – (# of years)] * (50%-80% depending on relative fitness). A very fit 40 year old might seek to maintain a heart rate of 144 during an extended training period. That is derived from the formula of (220-40)*80%. See your physician for guidance in exercising and determining a proper “training rate” or “training range” for your particular condition!

Dr. Schwartz’ HeavyHands – A Unique Contribution to the field of Exercise and Weight Loss

Dr. Schwartz’ HeavyHands – A Unique Contribution to the field of Exercise and Weight Loss

schwartzheavyhandsThough with each passing month the newsstands are filled with new magazines, books, and articles promoting the latest weight loss or exercise “secret”, the truth is an unsung hero created a method of exercise a few decades ago that would help most folks gain the physical prowess and ability to burn fat they crave. His name was Leonard Schwartz and he, himself, was walked the path most of us face. Fat, out of shape, and a chronic smoker… he was no candidate to live as long as he did. Nobody would have ever guessed the slight psychiatrist would go down in history as an exercise visionary!

Convinced in his 50’s of the need to change or die, he took up the recommended exercise protocol of his time: “aerobics”, i.e. “jogging”.  That started to work. Jogging 1500 to 2000 miles per year, his racing heart rate slowly dropped from 80 beats per minute to 60. That was slow progress to him, but it was better than nothing. The reduction in resting heart rates indicated his growing fitness, yet he did not find it satisfactory by any stretch.

About that time, a hamstring injury sidelined him. He was left needing to exercise aerobically, but unable to follow the medical advice of the day. He was forced to start searching for an alternative. He found his answer in the exercise research. Cross country skiers who used their arms AND their legs to exercise processed more oxygen and had greater aerobic capacity than any runner. So why did the “experts” only focus on using the lower extremities to exercise?  He started to search for a way around his hamstring injury that made running impossible.

First he tried swinging a baseball bat while doing deep knee bends. Ultimately he chose a different path, but the quest for a “full body” aerobic (hence the name “panaerobic”) workout never left him. Every exercise method he developed thereafter emphasized the principles he discovered after that hamstring injury:

Simultaneous Exercise – like those cross country skiers, the most aerobic benefit with the lowest level of perceived exertion comes when as much muscle mass is harnessed as possible. That means all four limbs are engaged and working together! Why? Because the arms and upper body are as effective “aerobic drivers” as the legs… and, because, compared to the legs, the aerobic capacity of the upper body has much more “upside potential”.

In plain English that means lifting HeavyHands properly during a 2.5 mph leisurely walk easily make the aerobic effect of a slow walk comparable to a 6 mph job without hand weights! Mimicking a cross country skier (the “Double Ski Pole” exercise) is perhaps the most aerobically powerful single exercise ever tested by the University of Pittsburgh scientists who helped Schwartz prove his every assertion!

Strength and Endurance – It wasn’t until Dr. Schwartz started working out with his “HeavyHands” weights that his heart rate moved below 60 down to the rate of approximately 40-50 beats per minute. When he added “strength moves” such as Double Ski Poling which he could perform with over 20% of his bodyweight for over an hour, his heart rate settled at 35 beats per minute!

Oddly enough, his HeavyHands method called for deceptively low weights. While strength athletes might lift hundreds of pounds in the Bench Press, Squat, or Deadlift in single lifts, all but the most advanced HeavyHands moves could be done with weights under 15 pounds! The difference is that Schwartz’ sculpted body, superior aerobic capacity, and great strength per pound (more on that later) came through high repetition exercise and increasing weight loads over time!

In fact, at times the lower the weight, the better! Ideally, the weights would be lifted repeatedly to “Level 3″ (moved overhead from the starting position at the hip). The people who “tried” HeavyHands and found it inadequate (even supposedly sophisticated researchers) failed because, universally, they assumed the small weights were to be “carried” instead of hefted quickly and repeatedly throughout the course of exercise.

Before moving on to the main topic of this article, it pays to ask just how strong and enduring was Dr. Schwartz?

Tom Furman relates this incident that is perhaps the most dramatic:

In 1982 Dr. Leonard Schwartz wrote, “Heavy Hands, The Ultimate Exercise”. It is an enjoyable book that is fascinating till this day. It contains many exercises including the “double ski pole” exercise. This motion follows the patterns of a Cross Country or Downhill Skier driving his poles into the snow and applying the full force of the body. Dr. Schwartz’ exercise uses handweights and a lunging step. You can do it on a track, uphill, (downhill can be tricky!), or in the small confines of an apartment. You can stand in one spot with a foot in a cast and do it as well. According to Len Schwartz, this exercise has the highest aerobic out of any upright movement.
In his experiments, the good Dr. has done this exercise with 23 % of his bodyweight for two hours. He logged 4200 arm cycles and 16,800 small paces. At 132 lbs. of bodyweight, this works out to be around 30 pounds total or two 15 lb. Heavy Hands. Previously he would spend days in bed with back pain. (Previous to changing his lifestyle). He said his back felt absolutely supple after this workout.

Let’s do the math. For someone 150lbs. this would be 17.25 pound Heavy Hands. For someone of 180 lbs. it would be 20.7 lb weights. 200 lbs. ??…..Around 23lbs.

As Furman asks… could you do 4200 reps with two dumbells each weight over 10% of your bodyweight? That remains an astounding display of strength and endurance!

Weightlifter John McKean who posed for photos in Dr. Schwartz’ “HeavyHands Walking Book” related in some personal email that before his death Dr. Schwartz performed 1200 pushups during the commercial breaks of a Pittsburgh Steeler’s game. On an exercise device he created for bodyweight exercise called the “Pan-X”, Dr. Schwartz could perform 35 chinups in the “L-position”… a sign of excellent arm and abdominal strength.

So why can we call HeavyHands a unique contribution to the field of exercise and weight loss?

Hopefully the first part has been answered. Dr. Schwartz himself was proof enough that a chubby and out of shape psychiatrist could become a lean, sculpted figure! His exploits of “strength endurance” are unparalleled in some ways. The scientific references that populate his books prove that Schwartz had found a way to drastically reduce the time and perceived effort of productive exercise!

But what about weight loss?

Here are some reasons Dr. Schwartz gave regarding HeavyHands’ unique ability to help people lose or maintain their weight:

• Energy consumption increases when pumping even light 2 lb Heavyhands by an average of 200% compared with ordinary walking without hand weights

• [HeavyHands users experience] a range of 30-300% increase in energy consumption (The Physician and Sportsmedicine, June 1987)

• Consumes approximately 450-600+ calories per hour (compared with 350 calories per hour for normal walking at 3.5 mph)

• Heavyhands can be practiced for relatively long periods, i.e. between half an hour and two hours at a time, or in 5-10 minute “exercise bites” throughout the day.

Schwartz never mentioned the ability of Heavyhands to maintain and build lean muscle mass for those who may otherwise be dieting. But the ability to maintain or even increase lean muscle mass means that – even at rest – the body burns more calories. Perhaps that’s why Dr. Schwartz said he could eat as much as a young horse and never gain weight!

Why is that? Dr. Schwartz exercise patents give a clue as to “why” HeavyHands is so powerful for fat burning. He believed that the muscle created when users performed “HeavyHands” were unique. They had increased numbers of “mitochondria” to power them. It’s these cellular furnaces that may facilitate easier weight loss than the muscles of sedentary folk.

As strange as it may seem, despite the benefits, despite the relatively low cost or training to start, and the amazing benefits of HeavyHand exercise… the exercise has in many ways died out. Surely Dr. Schwartz’ untimely death was partly to blame. Soon after his passing, manufacturers exited the market. There was much more profit potential chasing the “latest greatest” fad it seemed.

Still, some people recognize the value of Dr. Schwartz’ work still today. For them, HeavyHands weights are occasionally still available on Ebay.com … their supply is sporadic and the selection of weights is generally pathetic.

Thankfully entrepreneur Michael Senoff of WeightedHands.com began producing replacement weights and also specialized ergonomic handles for “HeavyHands” exercise, the prospects for finding new equipment were virtually nill. Now, thanks to Senoff, the HeavyHands enthusiast can progress from the smallest weights used at the beginning to the heavier weights required for maximum strength endurance development. Finally, people are able to progress as far as they want using HeavyHands. Once again, Dr. Schwartz’ proven methods are helping a new generation of exercise and weight loss enthusiasts.