October, 2014

now browsing by month

 

The Case Against Dumbbells . . .

Did you know the term “Dumbbell” didn’t originally refer to a handheld weight?

Instead it referred to a real life “bell” like the ones that would ring day and night from a church or public building. People would install them in their homes for the exercise value of tugging on the rope!

The only difference was that these bells didn’t ring. They were mute or “dumb”… hence the term “dumbbell”!

It just goes to show that just when you think you know everything worth knowing about something, you may end up having to rethink what you thought you “knew for sure”!

That’s not only true about the “name” of the dumbbell. It’s also true when it comes to thinking that those “dumbbells” you’re using down at the gym are the tool you need to blast blubber or get that “ripped” and muscular look you’re working out to achieve.

…in fact, it’s quite likely those dumbbells you’re lifting may not be doing the work you need – and never can!

Why’s that?

Simple.

To look “ripped” you must not only build muscle, you must burn calories!

You must obliterate the layers of subcutaneous fat that will hide whatever muscle you do build like a “cloaking device”.

Burning those calories takes sheer work. And the dumbbells you’re using and the way you’re using them aren’t capable of getting the work done that you need to do!

It’s just math really.

Let’s say you’re trying to build up some lean and mean arms and shoulders.

Hey, who isn’t?

So you do three sets of 10 curls with 20 lb. dumbbells.

You rest a few minutes between each set and before moving to the next exercise… Overhead presses for three sets of 10 as well.

Then you do three sets of 10 upright rows with the same dumbbells.

How much work have you really done?

By the time you’ve done the set and rested for one minute you’ve got about 2.5 to 3 minutes invested per set.

By the time you’re done you’ve worked 25 to 30 minutes total and still haven’t worked the rest of your body.

We still really haven’t gotten to how much work you’ve really done.

When it comes to “work”, let’s figure that when you move your dumbbell from the resting position at your thighs to the overhead position you’ve moved the weights a total of 42 inches.

(You’re doing the exercises separately but we’ll combine them when calculating the work output!)

When you’re doing the upright rows, you’re moving the weight 25 inches total.

Now we’ll calculate your total “work output” by multiplying the distance, by the weight, by the number of repetitions. OK?

Curls and Presses totaled – 42 inches x 40 lbs. x 30 = 50,400 “units”

Upright rows totaled – 25 inches x 40 lbs x 30 = 30,000 “units”

The totals “units” of work output for the three combined exercises, then, are 80,400 units in 25-30 minutes.

Respectable? Or not so much?

What if you could learn how to….

  • Increase the work output by 500%,
  • CUT your training time by more than HALF (or 10Xs your work output in the time previously used ineffectively!)
  • Burn massive calories and EXPOSE those “hidden” muscles
  • Exercise your whole body, AND
  • Give you the endurance of a long distance runner without ever breaking into a jog!

You CAN achieve all these benefits faster than you think by forgetting the dumbbells, changing your thinking, and learning to walk with WEIGHTED HANDS!

It’s true. The very same experiment has been done repeatedly while being tested by physicians and university trained observers!

Best of all you will turn your whole body into a FAT BURNING, OXYGEN PROCESSING MACHINE that in the words of Dr. Leonard Schwartz who pioneered this type of training allowed him to “eat like a young horse” while boasting a ripped, lean physique at age 70+  that turned the heads of men and women far younger than him!

If you’re not reading this while seated, sit down because your head is about to explode!

If you thought you were getting a “good workout” for your arms, you could be doing FAR BETTER, working out FAR LESS, and actually achieving the results you’re seeking by walking with WEIGHTED HANDS.

If you had simply walked with our ergonomically designed 10lb. WEIGHTED HANDS, for 25 minutes, you’d have performed over 1 million work units with your arms alone, not to mention the work done by your legs!

That’s over ten times the work units your 20 lb. dumbbell workout gave you.

While lifting dumbbells the old-fashioned way isn’t a great calorie burner, walking with WEIGHTED HANDS will burn far more calories than lifting dumbbells or even running alone.

How much, you ask?

First, that depends on your bodyweight because you’ll be moving your whole body.

But based on our example, someone weighing 125 lbs, walking with WEIGHTED HANDS and lifting 10lbs 42 inches would burn an amazing calorie load! How much?

If our 125 pound person ran for 25 minutes at the speed of 5 miles per hour, he’d burn 189 calories… and do virtually nothing for his arms and shoulders in the process.

But walk with those 10 lb. WEIGHTED HANDS for 25 minutes as described above and he’ll not only get a powerful arm and shoulder workout along with solid leg exercise, he’ll also burn 300 calories, almost DOUBLE without even breaking into a jog!

And, of course, if you weigh more, you’re burning more calories! Using the example above, a 200 pound person would be burning 960 calories in only 50 minutes!

Why does this burn calories so well? It’s been known for decades that athletes who use the most oxygen when they compete (and therefore burn the most calories) are the ones who use both their arms and legs at the same time like cross-country skiers.

When you walk with WEIGHTED HANDS, you harness this knowledge for your own bodybuilding advantage!

As your arms become conditioned, you’ll find that it becomes easier and easier to burn the calories you want to stay “ripped” because working your arms and legs together “feels” easier than working exercises that only isolate a small muscle group.

With WEIGHTED HANDS it becomes possible to build muscle, burn fat, and take care of your heart in one “package”!

Because of the amazing CALORIE BURN that comes with WEIGHTED HANDS instead of dumbbells you’d be well on your way to actually GETTING that ripped physique and those muscular arms (and whole body in fact) most gym rats CRAVE while taking care of your cardiovascular health at the same time!

Who knew it could be so easy?

Waited Hands should never be confused with dumbbells. One look at our ergonomic design clearly sets Weighted Hands apart from such conventional weights. Our textured no-slip grip and the soft form fitting back-straps will provide you with maximum comfort over an extended period. They’ll fit snugly onto your hands. They don’t have to be gripped so there is no chafing, no straining, no cramps, and no constriction.

Weighted Gloves May Alleviate Bone Mineral Redistribution

Weighted gloves may alleviate bone mineral redistribution

THE CAPITAL TIMES, Tuesday, April 3,1984

Are “Heavyhands” weights and weighted fitness gloves gimmicks?

Or will they prevent runners from behaving like mule deer?

Researchers discovered in 1973 that something odd occurred in mule deer when they developed antlers.

Bone mineral was lost from unstressed areas of the deer, such as the ribs, and redistributed to the growing antlers.

Ten years went by before the significance of the bone mineral redistribution phenomenon really became clear. Its importance emerged in research by Dr. Everett L.

Smith, director of the University of Wisconsin Biogerontology Laboratory.

Smith was studying osteoporosis, the loss of bone mass during aging. Osteoporosis is a major problem for older women, who suffer fractures as their bones become more and more brittle.

The impact of exercise on bone, which behaves much like muscle when placed under stress, was already known.

Studies showed distance runners had 20 percent more bone mineral content in their femurs than on-runners.

Professional tennis players were found to have thicker humeral bones in their playing arm – 35 percent for men and 28 percent for woman – than in their non-playing arm.

At the same time, studies of astronauts showed they lost 7 percent of their heel bones during only 10 days of weightlessness in space. People on bedrest for 36 weeks showed a loss of 39 percent of their bone mineral content.

Smith studied groups of women ages 35 to 95. His studies showed that a combination of exercise (aerobic dance) and good diet (with adequate calcium and vitamin D) reversed the women’s loss of bone mass, which normally accelerates after menopause.

In one three-year study, the control group lost 3.29 percent of their bone mineral content while subjects on a calcium-vitamin D supplement gained 1.58 percent and those on an exercise program gained 2.29 percent.

In another three-year study, the control group lost bone mass at a rate of 2.44 percent, while an exercise group gained 1.39 percent.

The gain was not constant, however.

Smith, who was using a device that measured bones in the arm to gauge mineral content of the subjects, found the exercise group experienced a drop in bone mass the first year before scoring gains in the second and third years.

The unexpected initial decline was eventually determined to be due to the calcium redistribution mechanism like that found in mule deer.

Women placed on an aerobic dance program stressed their legs, for which calcium was taken from unstressed areas like the arms.

The femur thickened, while the ulna and humerus initially weakened.

Smith said the skeletal system behaves like the muscular system. Both adapt to the stresses placed upon the body.

“If you don’t use the human body, not only do you waste muscle mass and the heart, but you also lose bone,” Smith said.

Osteoporosis is mainly a problem for women, who lose 30 percent of their bone between the ages of 30 and 70.

Men start the aging process with about 40 percent more bone mass, lose it at a slower rate and usually don’t have a problem with weak bones until their mid-80s.
With aging women suffering 150,000 to 200,000 broken hips a year in the United States, getting them to exercise could have a big impact on health care costs.

Smith estimates the bill for their hospital care alone is about $1 billion and, when nursing home care and other costs are added, the total price tag for osteoporosis is about $3 billion a year.

What the calcium redistribution effect indicates, however, is that aerobic exercise like dance or running is not enough.

Weights are also needed to maintain the upper body and Smith now recommends a routine that includes use of wrist or hand-held weights and pulling on surgical tubing attached to a post or wall to prevent redistribution.

The evidence seems to support the “Heavyhands” devices and weighted gloves sold for running.

If you don’t have time to get in upper body workouts separately, they are probably the way to go.

End.

Thankfully entrepreneur Michael Senoff of www.WeightedHands.com began producing replacement weights and also specialized ergonomic handles for “HeavyHands” exercise, the prospects for finding new equipment were virtually nill.

Now, thanks to Senoff, the HeavyHands enthusiast can progress from the smallest weights used at the beginning to the heavier weights required for maximum strength endurance development.

Finally, people are able to progress as far as they want using HeavyHands.

Once again, Dr. Schwartz’ proven methods are helping a new generation of exercise and weight loss enthusiasts.

Panaerobics . . .

Panaerobics

Fitness TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1988

Fitness Expert Believes in Combined Exercise

While he and his wife were strolling one hot summer evening a few years ago, Leonard Schwartz, the Pittsburg psychiatrist who invented Heavyhands, spied a runner with the hand weights.

But instead of pumping the weights up and down as he ran, the young man was merely carrying them.

“I ran after him for four blocks in Manhattan, yelling in the 90-degree heat,” Schwartz recalled.

“I walked with him three or four blocks trying to explain about pumping them. And when he went off, he was doing it right.”

This story comes pouring out in his stream-of-consciousness way, and it neatly illustrates the intensity of the obsessions that has come to drive Schwartz’s life: combined exercise.

The concept is simple.

Use as many muscle groups as possible during a workout to achieve maximum oxygen consumption by the muscle cells.

The trendy little weights cushioned with red foam rubber used to accomplish this are incidental.

Schwartz doesn’t disagree that you could be grasping two jars of mayonnaise. Or two bags of bird shot. Or two stones.

It’s the weight and the movement of the arms in concert with the rest of the body that is everything.

Schwartz is so certain of the purity of his vision that he believes he could alter forever the world of fitness if those who are blind and deaf to his idea would but only open their eyes and listen.

To this end, he has closed his psychoanalytic practice in Pittsburgh and devotes himself full time to exercise physiology.

Using the fortune he has amassed from Heavyhands and sales of his two books about their use, he has equipped a physiology laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh, where he holds the title of adjunct professor of physical education and health.

In the laboratory he has installed tom Auble, a former engineer who became a Heavyhands convert, switched over to exercise physiology and is completing work on a doctorate at the university.

Auble’s master’s thesis completed two years ago was titled: Cardiorespiratory Adaptations to Heavyhands Exercise Training.

Subsequent papers and research projects by Auble on exercise with hand weights have substantiated Schwartz’s beliefs about combined exercise.

Or have they?

There has been a lack of recognition, a downright skepticism, from the exercise physiology establishment about the use of hand weights and combined exercise.

“We have had a deuce of a time getting the academic community to pay attention to our research, even after it’s been properly referenced and published,” Schwartz wrote in a recent letter to an interested party.

“The typical paper on the subject would suggest a grudging 7-10 percent increase in workload when hand weights are added.”

But some of Auble’s latest research using fit experimental subjects has found an astonishing increase of 500 percent in workload when the workout involved hand weights according to the Schwartz method.

The key is pumping the weights. The more the arms move them and, particularly, the higher they are rhythmically lifted, the greater the workout.

If Auble’s findings are accurate, it would mean that for the same amount of time spent in a typical workout involving running or a similar activity, vastly greater aerobic benefit could be had from a Schwartz workout.

Schwartz is committed to spreading the word.

He has coined the term “panaerobic” to describe aerobic workouts in which all the body’s muscles are systematically called upon.

He created a video, “Heavyhands Panaerobics Basics,” starring himself, Auble and another colleague, Judy Shasek.

And he has formed his own book publishing company, Panaerobic Press.

He has formed the Leonard and Millie Schwartz Foundation (Millie is his wife of 42 years) to fund research into combined exercise.
“Our mission is to seek out brilliant young minds in the area of exercise physiology,” Schwartz said. “If I have the dough and they have the brains, I will support their research.”

Presumably, research intended to illustrate further the benefits of combined exercise will meet the warmest reception.

Schwartz is the first to admit such activity might sound like just another fitness mania entrepreneur cashing in while his products are still hot.

He does not reveal how much he has made from Heavyhands and the books. But more than 2 million of the weights have been sold for about $20 a set, and he owns the patent.

His first book sold about 400,000 copies in hardback and paperback.

“One of my problems is that I’m seen as Moneybags Schwartz,” he said. “People cannot believe that I could be interested in more than that. I’ve had my taste at being rich and it doesn’t feel any better than being poor.”

“Exercise should involve all of our musculature,” Schwartz continued.

“Take a lot of muscle fibers and get them working a little bit. The total amount of work is much higher. The lexicons of exercise will be rewritten someday to make that point.”

Schwartz began running and then using hand weights in his early 50s because of the fear of death and a narcissistic desire to improve his body.

Now 63, his body is muscular and sculpted.

End.

Thankfully entrepreneur Michael Senoff of www.WeightedHands.com began producing replacement weights and also specialized ergonomic handles for “HeavyHands” exercise, the prospects for finding new equipment were virtually nill.

Now, thanks to Senoff, the HeavyHands enthusiast can progress from the smallest weights used at the beginning to the heavier weights required for maximum strength endurance development.

Finally, people are able to progress as far as they want using HeavyHands.

Once again, Dr. Schwartz’ proven methods are helping a new generation of exercise and weight loss enthusiasts.

Heavyhands Workouts Are Off And Running

add_WeightsLiving Today, Cedar Rapids/Jine 14, 1984

There’s more to today’s jogger than running shorts and shoes.

Heavyhands, Lace Weights, weight vests and pulse meters are likely to accompany exercises as they tone and moan, and retailers report swift sales of these accessories.

Heavyhands is the “real craze” at Eby’s Sporting Goods, Westdale Mall, according to store manager Holly Netolicky. The idea behind the red foam-covered solid steel rod and aluminum handle is to tone the upper torso while exercising the legs. Weights from 1 to 5 pounds can be attached, and Eby’s most popular seller is the 3-pound weight, according to Netolicky.

The suggested price for Heavyhands is $19.99, which includes 1 pound weights.  Additional weights are sold separately and range from $7.99 for 2 pounds to $19.99 for 5 pounds.

Triangle Bands, a member of the Heavyhands family, are popular at Sporty Lade, Lindale mall, according to store co-owner Lisa Miller. The flexible foam-padded and Velcro-covered band is $13.95 per paid, and fits either write or ankle.

Weights range from 1.1 to 3.5 pounds with bands in two sizes to accommodate exercisers with small measurements, Miller notes. She says the lowest weight is the biggest seller.

“Even 1 pound of weight gives a lot more stress.

You don’t need a lot of added weight because the repetition is what’s important.”

The weight glove, available at Five Seasons Sporting Goods, 3300 Johnson Ave. NW, is particularly appealing to female joggers, according to manager Steve Miller. Because weights are built into the back and palm of the glove, runners need not grip an attached weight.

“Women buy more of these because they’re more comfortable than Heavyhands,” says Miller.

He quotes weight gloves at $15.50.

Although upper torso weights can be used for any aerobic exercise, sources note most sales are to joggers.

“Because running is a very specific exercise, most runners will use weights to build up arm and shoulder strength,” says Lisa Miller.

Arm Weights are harmless for most joggers, according to Dr. Fred Pilcher, a member of the Linn County Orthopedics and Rheumatology group.

He’s also director of the Linn County Sports Injury Clinic.

The added stress, however, he says, could cause trouble if the exercises already suffers back and shoulder muscle problems.

Two and 3-pound dumbbells are an important part of Mercy Wellness exercise programs, according to director Dagmar Munn.

Participants use the weights during aerobic walking and dance routines.

“They know they’re really working their muscles,” says Munn.

“When their muscles get tired in four minutes, they’ve had a real workout.”

Described by Munn as an “adamant weight user,” Lynn Kieler, a nurse at Mercy Hospital, routinely adds two to three pounds to her thrice weekly aerobic workouts.

“I’d been taking aerobic classes for about two years and my weight was good, but I wanted to be firmer,” says Kieler.

“Weights have increased my endurance and toned my muscles.”

Ankle and Foot weights also challenge the stamina of exercise buffs. Choices include Velcro-covered wrap-arounds, or lace weights which lace right through the shoe on both sides.

Lace weights come with eight small “bags” which can be added on and cost $19.99, according to Neolicky. Ankle weights are priced between $14.99 and $16.99.

These weights are used mostly by football and basketball players to build leg muscles, according to Pilcher. He does not recommend ankle weights for general conditioning or jogging.

“Whether you’re a world class athlete or someone who hasn’t exercised much, the body can’t take that kind of stress,” he says. “Weights add stress and increase the impact of the foot hitting the ground.”

For any weight-exercise combination, Pilcher stresses caution and not doing “too much too soon.”

Weight vests, or bands are a challenge even to fitness “heavy-hitters,” according to Steve Miller.

The Logjammer, a foam-lined canvas vest designed and manufactured by Jack Zack, “allows the wearer to build up strength in legs and torso.”

The vest has 36 pockets, front and back, each capable of holding a one-and-three-eighths pound steel weight.

So Why Add weights to the already grueling routing of aerobic exercise?

“By using a 2- to 4-pound ankle weight,” says Munn, “you’re adding 2 to 4 pounds to your body weight and causing more resistance and causing your heart rate to increase. You’re helping increase your endurance.

“If you’re using 5 pounds at the most, you’re doing a nice, moderate workout for your heart and lungs.”

“The added weight means you work less time and get the same benefits,” adds Netolicky.

Exercises also can detect when weights would be beneficial. “In running or aerobic exercise, if you find you’re not working as hard as you used to when you first started, weights can really help,” says Lisa Miller.

In case you want to hear what your body has to say about all this added stress and weight, a pulse meter is on the market.

The unit is easily slipped into a pocket and records your pulse rate as you are exercising, according to Don Stepanek, assistant manager of Northtowne Schwinn Cyclery Ltd,. 1150 Blairs Ferry Road NE. It costs $89.95.

“We sell them mostly to people who have had heart problems, or who have started exercising on a doctor’s advice,” he says.

End.

Thankfully entrepreneur Michael Senoff of www.WeightedHands.com began producing replacement weights and also specialized ergonomic handles for “HeavyHands” exercise, the prospects for finding new equipment were virtually nill.

Now, thanks to Senoff, the HeavyHands enthusiast can progress from the smallest weights used at the beginning to the heavier weights required for maximum strength endurance development.

Finally, people are able to progress as far as they want using HeavyHands.

Once again, Dr. Schwartz’ proven methods are helping a new generation of exercise and weight loss enthusiasts.

Young At Any Age: Weights Aid in Exercise Program

Hand_Weights

THE PROGRESS, Clearfield, Curwensville, Phllipsburg, Moshonnon Valley, Pa., Monday, August 27, 1964

When it comes to physical fitness are you a model of mediocrity?

That was the case with 59-year-old Dr. Leonard Schwartz five years ago.

His work as a doctor gave him little time for exercise – his only workout, making rounds. Add 15 years of heavy smoking, 20 of high blood pressure and chronic back problems.

But this condition doesn’t seem to add up to the trim, well-built figure of Dr. Schwartz pictured on the back cover of his best-selling book, “Heavyhands – The Ultimate Exercise” (Warner Books, $8.95)

That’s because “Heavyhands” changed his life, Dr. Schwartz told me in a recent interview.  Heavyhands are weights – but very special ones – that maximize the benefits of aerobic exercising.

They’re cushioned for comfort. They also feature straps so that if your hands are stiff or lack a strong grasp, as mine do, you can use them with ease.

You slip into Heavyhands much as you slip on a glove – the strap is positioned behind the knuckles so that the rounded shaft fits comfortably into the palm of your hand.

At each end of the shaft, you can insert weights, ranging from one up to 10-pounders.

Added Plus

What Heavyhands provide, says Dr. Schwartz is an extra dimension to exercise.

They bring strength plus endurance to muscles.

Best of all, you’re never too unfit or too old to try the program, though Dr. Schwartz said, “It’s wise to consult your doctor before undertaking this or any other exercise program.”

He recommends them to be used, after an evaluation program by your doctor, if you have a physical handicap, hypertension or cardio-circulatory or orthopedic problems.

Gets It All in Action

The key to the exercise program Dr. Schwartz has evolved with these weights, which are lighter than conventional dumbbells lies in combined arm, leg and trunk movement.

“The weights put special emphasis on neglected muscles of the upper torso and works these muscles in combination with leg exercises,” he explained.

Heavyhands aren’t just for those who follow a set program of exercises, Dr. Schwartz stressed.

They’re great for walkers too. Once walkers are well-trained in using the weights, the added upper extremity work they provide enhances the benefits of walking and makes arms equal partners with legs.

Burns More Calories

“For example, a 154-pound man who walks three miles an hour burns four calories per minute,” Dr. Schwartz said, “The same man, pumping high at 120 steps per minute, using one-pound Heavyhands, burns 10 to 12 calories per minute.”

One of the most appealing aspects of these weights is that they make exercise fun and what’s fun is enjoyable. They keep beginning exercisers from losing interest in working out and that’s a key to success.

They also keep exercise from seeming exhaustingly strenuous. “The principle is simple.

When the exertion is shared by more muscles, the exerciser is actually working harder but without feeling he is working harder.

Because the work load is better distributed, it stands to reason that the benefits are better distributed.”

I’ve tried some of the easy exercises in the “Heavyhands” book (check it out at your local bookshop or library). They’re great. I’ve also taken my weights walking and climbing stairs.

Anything that adds zest to exercise and maximizes its benefits, as these weights do, is worth a look.

Try them. I think you’ll like them.
I do.

End.

Thankfully entrepreneur Michael Senoff of www.WeightedHands.com began producing replacement weights and also specialized ergonomic handles for “HeavyHands” exercise, the prospects for finding new equipment were virtually nill.

Now, thanks to Senoff, the HeavyHands enthusiast can progress from the smallest weights used at the beginning to the heavier weights required for maximum strength endurance development.

Finally, people are able to progress as far as they want using HeavyHands.

Once again, Dr. Schwartz’ proven methods are helping a new generation of exercise and weight loss enthusiasts.

Psychoanalyst’s answer to aerobic exercise is his own ‘Heavyhands’

jog

Psychoanalyst’s answer to aerobic exercise is his own ‘Heavyhands’

THE GETTYSBURG TIMES, SATURDAY, AUGUST 28, 1982

Pittsburgh (AP) – Psychoanalyst Leonard Schwartz beckons his patients to come in and sit down, then to get up with weights and run around – therapy he prescribes to build the body and massage the mind.

By clutching small barbells as they run, his patients strengthen their arms as well as their legs and develop better self-images.

“I see not only parallels between mind and body, I consider mind and body one,” said Schwartz, 57, who claims his new exercise program, “Heavyhands,” makes followers look and feel better.

Until he was 49, Schwartz avoided strenuous exercise. He carried 147 pounds on his 5-foot-7 frame, suffered from high blood pressure and smoked several packs of cigarettes a day.

One day he decided his body needed help.

“I started running and I built a swimming pool,” he said. “I started all those aerobic schticks.”

“That was all self-serving, narcissistic business. I was concerned only about my own body and my wife’s. Then I started thinking about it more as a physician than as a mere consumer of exercise.”

Schwartz discovered the secret was to clutch small weights in each hand while he ran, danced or simply touched his toes.

“It’s an over-kill philosophy,” he said. “You heavy the hands to make them light.”

To further develop his upper torso, Schwartz began modifying the exercise, swinging his weighted hands higher and higher, again and again.

“I need a comprehensive exercise…I wanted a form of exercise that incorporated more of the fitness factors than any other system did,” he said.

After a few years of almost daily workouts, Schwartz’ weight dropped to a muscular 132 pounds.

His resting pulse rate shrunk from 80 to 38 a minute, and his oxygen-consumption rate more than doubled.

Every part of this body improved, something no other aerobic exercise ever accomplished, Schwartz said.

“ ‘Heavyhands’ is an endurance dominated, or aerobic exercise like all the others. But it’s a combined form of exercise – the simultaneous use of four limbs and the trunk. There’s a terrific emphasis on the upper extremities, which have been neglected historically, even in swimming,” he said.

Better than jogging, dancing, cross-country skiing, and swimming?

“It’s the best exercise in the world,” he said. “Before swimming was as good as running, which was as good as rope jumping. But that’s all changed with ‘Heavyhands.’

“There is no belly or back aerobics besides ‘Heavyhands.’ Since there are 75 million people in the country with back problems, I thought I had to address that problem.”

More calories are lost, as less effort is exerted, according to Schwartz. And anyone who is reasonably healthy – young or old – can follow the program, he said.

Joggers lose about 10 to 15 calories per minute while running; that can climb to 20 calories per minute while walking and swinging their weighted hands, Schwartz said.

It’s not that other forms of exercise aren’t good – they’re just not as good, according to Schwartz.

Although between 75 million and 135 million Americans profess to exercise, not more than 3 percent or 4 percent of them actually are fit “in the ultimate sense,” Schwartz said.

“The Jane Fondas, the Richard Simmons, are really doing a lot to raise national consciousness about the issue of movement and activity and health,” he said. “Mine is more research-oriented. It’s based on myself and other subjects…anybody I can get into the laboratory.”

So far, Schwartz has taught his family, friends and colleagues how to exercise the “Heavyhands” way. He’s held exercise sessions at Montefiore Hospital, where he is chief of the psychiatric division, and at home for the elderly. And he’s organized a short daily run – with weights – through his neighborhood.

Interest has swelled since his book on the subject, entitled “Heavyhands,” was released in May. He’s appeared on television and radio programs and has been featured in national magazines.

This fall, he’s considering teaching “Heavyhands” to athletes at Iowa State University.

He hopes to use profits from his book and a set of weights he’s designed – padded barbells that cling to the hand – to establish a large laboratory where he can perfect the method.

Schwartz considers “Heavyhands” a lifestyle.

“It’s difficult to understand how anybody with the option to exercise could abandon that option,” said Schwartz, who sets aside four hours a week for “Heavyhands.”

“When I know I can run 10 or 12 flights of stairs without any difficulty at all, or if I can run 19 miles pumping a couple of 8-pound weights all the way, anything less than that seems to be substandard.

“But I wasn’t always that way.

So it’s obvious anyone can convert.”

End.

Thankfully entrepreneur Michael Senoff of www.WeightedHands.com began producing replacement weights and also specialized ergonomic handles for “HeavyHands” exercise, the prospects for finding new equipment were virtually nill.

Now, thanks to Senoff, the HeavyHands enthusiast can progress from the smallest weights used at the beginning to the heavier weights required for maximum strength endurance development.

Finally, people are able to progress as far as they want using HeavyHands.

Once again, Dr. Schwartz’ proven methods are helping a new generation of exercise and weight loss enthusiasts.

Pumping Weights on the Run : New York Times.

November, 13, 1988

While he and his wife were strolling one hot summer evening a few years ago, Leonard Schwartz, the Pittsburg psychiatrist who invented Heavyhands, spied a runner with the hand weights.

But instead of pumping the weights up and down as he ran, the young man was merely carrying them.

“I ran after him for four blocks in Manhattan, yelling in the 90-degree heat,” Schwartz recalled.

“I walked with him three or four blocks trying to explain about pumping them. And when he went off, he was doing it right.”

This story comes pouring out in his stream-of-consciousness way, and it neatly illustrates the intensity of the obsessions that has come to drive Schwartz’s life:

Combined Exercise. The concept is simple.

Use as many muscle groups as possible during a workout to achieve maximum oxygen consumption by the muscle cells.

The trendy little weights cushioned with red foam rubber used to accomplish this are incidental.

Schwartz doesn’t disagree that you could be grasping two jars of mayonnaise. Or two bags of bird shot. Or two stones.

It’s the weight and the movement of the arms in concert with the rest of the body that is everything.

Schwartz is so certain of the purity of his vision that he believes he could alter forever the world of fitness if those who are blind and deaf to his idea would but only open their eyes and listen.

To this end, he has closed his psychoanalytic practice in Pittsburgh and devotes himself full time to exercise physiology.

Using the fortune he has amassed from Heavyhands and sales of his two books about their use, he has equipped a physiology laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh, where he holds the title of adjunct professor of physical education and health.

In the laboratory he has installed tom Auble, a former engineer who became a Heavyhands convert, switched over to exercise physiology and is completing work on a doctorate at the university.

Auble’s master’s thesis completed two years ago was titled: Cardiorespiratory Adaptations to Heavyhands Exercise Training.

Subsequent papers and research projects by Auble on exercise with hand weights have substantiated Schwartz’s beliefs about combined exercise.

Or have they?

There has been a lack of recognition, a downright skepticism, from the exercise physiology establishment about the use of hand weights and combined exercise.

“We have had a deuce of a time getting the academic community to pay attention to our research, even after it’s been properly referenced and published,” Schwartz wrote in a recent letter to an interested party.

“The typical paper on the subject would suggest a grudging 7-10 percent increase in workload when hand weights are added.”

But some of Auble’s latest research using fit experimental subjects has found an astonishing increase of 500 percent in workload when the workout involved hand weights according to the Schwartz method.

The key is pumping the weights. The more the arms move them and, particularly, the higher they are rhythmically lifted, the greater the workout.

If Auble’s findings are accurate, it would mean that for the same amount of time spent in a typical workout involving running or a similar activity, vastly greater aerobic benefit could be had from a Schwartz workout.

Schwartz is committed to spreading the word.

He has coined the term “panaerobic” to describe aerobic workouts in which all the body’s muscles are systematically called upon.

He created a video,  “Heavyhands Panaerobics Basics,” starring himself, Auble and another colleague, Judy Shasek.

And he has formed his own book publishing company, Panaerobic Press.

He has formed the Leonard and Millie Schwartz Foundation (Millie is his wife of 42 years) to fund research into combined exercise.
“Our mission is to seek out brilliant young minds in the area of exercise physiology,” Schwartz said. “If I have the dough and they have the brains, I will support their research.”

Presumably, research intended to illustrate further the benefits of combined exercise will meet the warmest reception.

Schwartz is the first to admit such activity might sound like just another fitness mania entrepreneur cashing in while his products are still hot.

He does not reveal how much he has made from Heavyhands and the books. But more than 2 million of the weights have been sold for about $20 a set, and he owns the patent.

His first book sold about 400,000 copies in hardback and paperback.

“One of my problems is that I’m seen as Moneybags Schwartz,” he said. “People cannot believe that I could be interested in more than that.

I’ve had my taste at being rich and it doesn’t feel any better than being poor.”

“Exercise should involve all of our musculature,” Schwartz continued.

“Take a lot of muscle fibers and get them working a little bit.

The total amount of work is much higher.

The lexicons of exercise will be rewritten someday to make that point.”

Schwartz began running and then using hand weights in his early 50s because of the fear of death and a narcissistic desire to improve his body.

Now 63, his body is muscular and sculpted.

Thankfully entrepreneur Michael Senoff of www.WeightedHands.com began producing replacement weights and also specialized ergonomic handles for “HeavyHands” exercise, the prospects for finding new equipment were virtually nill.

Now, thanks to Senoff, the HeavyHands enthusiast can progress from the smallest weights used at the beginning to the heavier weights required for maximum strength endurance development.

Finally, people are able to progress as far as they want using HeavyHands.

Once again, Dr. Schwartz’ proven methods are helping a new generation of exercise and weight loss enthusiasts.

Dr. Schwartz’ Exercise Patents

Dr. Schwartz’ Exercise Patents

schwartzhandclaspOne newly “mined” source of information about Dr. Schwartz’ progress in thought regarding Strength Endurance, Panaerobics, Isotonometrics, and Long Strength, and Panaerobics comes from patents filed with the US Patent Office on a variety of topics

Of course, there are the original patents for his “HeavyHands” weights called the “Apparatus for exercising that is used with a hand“ or “Aerobic Hand Weights” in the patent filings, but in this blog, the patents of most interest are the ones related to Schwartz’ strength endurance methods, a strength endurance exercise device, and even the method of clasping his hands as he performed weight free four limb exercise!

The author continues to discover them and “decipher” them … if the reader knows of others, posting such links in the comments would be greatly appreciated!

“Fitness Method” (Hand Clasps)

This method came to be known as “isotonometrics” as far as this writer can tell. The image at the top of this page comes from this patent filing. It used hand clasps instead of weights to produce a similar effect for anyone who did not care to use weights for whatever reason. Once one sees Dr. Schwartz working out “in place” in this heavyhands video at DailyMotion, it is simple to imagine these or similar movements joined to the hand clasps described in the patent at the link.

Here is how Dr. Schwartz described his method in the patent itself:
A fitness method for an exerciser combines the benefits of isometric-like exercising with isotonic exercising for simultaneous training of the exerciser’s cardiovascular and skeletal musculature systems and strength and endurance buildup. The method entails coupling the exerciser’s hands together in any one of a number of configurations and generating an isometric-like force during the coupling stage. The coupled hands can then be moved in any number of directions or coupled differently while maintaining or varying the isometric-like force during the movement. In addition, further training can be achieved by moving one or more other body parts during the coupled hand movement. The legs, torso, shoulders, and/or neck can be moved in any number of directions or sequences to exercise different muscle groups in conjunction with the muscle groups being worked by the movement of the coupled hands.

Alternatively, author Marty Gallagher – friend and admirer of Dr. Schwartz – describes his adaptation of the “isotonometrics” principles adapted from Dr. Schwartz’ findings in his chapter on “Third Way Cardio” in his book “The Purposeful Primitive”.

“Strength Endurance Method”  and

“Strength Endurance Exercise Apparatus”

These related patents describe first the “Method” and then the suggested “Apparatus” for developing “strength endurance” (aka “Long Strength”) through the use of four limb bodyweight exercise using the patented device Dr. Schwartz developed.

While thousands of handweights were in production after Dr. Schwartz’ book, Schwartz student John McKean said only three of the devices described in the patent were ever made. It was called the “Pan-X” machine.  Once the patent’s images are seen, it’s obvious that Dr. Schwartz’ device would have had strong competition from today’s “Suspension Trainers” or “Power Tower” (i.e. dip and pull up station)

Here is how Dr. Schwartz’ patent filing represents what he was trying to accomplish:

In an alternative embodiment, the present invention is related to a method of exercising which uses both the arms and legs to perform sustained aerobic and strength conditioning movements…. In a preferred embodiment, the rhythmic bipedal movements includes jogging.The rhythmic bipedal movements can also include scissor kicking in a forward/backward direction or in a sideways direction. Alternatively, the rhythmic bipedal movements includes alternate leg lifting. Preferably, during alternate leg lifting, the user dips on his stationary leg. Leg lifting can include kicking in the forward direction or kicking in the backward direction. In a preferred embodiment, forward kicking includes the step of high knee kicking. Alternatively, alternate leg lifting can beperformed to the side. In another preferred embodiment, the rythmatic bipedal movements includes the step of leaning from side to side…..

Students of Dr. Schwartz will find good information in these patents to help understand his thinking in the development of exercise that did not rely on weights to achieve excellent aerobic and strength gains. While they are not as precise as a book might be, they do spark the imagination and allow the potential user to derive exercise movements from those explicitly listed, or discern underlying principles so that other exercise combinations might be created by the individual user as Dr. Schwartz anticipated.
Enjoy!

Wholebody Fitness for Seniors VHS

Wholebody Fitness for Seniors VHS

schwartzwholebodyfitness

Dr. Leonard Schwartz created a video to demonstrate the performance of “isotonometrics”. Oddly enough the video title did not include the name!

The video is still available in VHS format: WholeBody Fitness for Seniors

If that is no longer available, the reader can read the patent filing related to “hand clasps” or “isotonometrics” and envision how they might be used along with Dr. Schwartz’ “in place” exercise moves shown here with weights at DailyMotion.

From Dr. Schwartz’ patent filing, here is his intended result for the type of exercise revealed in the video:

A fitness method for an exerciser combines the benefits of isometric-like exercising with isotonic exercising for simultaneous training of the exerciser’s cardiovascular and skeletal musculature systems and strength and endurance buildup. The method entails coupling the exerciser’s hands together in any one of a number of configurations and generating an isometric-like force during the coupling stage. The coupled hands can then be moved in any number of directions or coupled differently while maintaining or varying the isometric-like force during the movement. In addition, further training can be achieved by moving one or more other body parts during the coupled hand movement. The legs, torso, shoulders, and/or neck can be moved in any number of directions or sequences to exercise different muscle groups in conjunction with the muscle groups being worked by the movement of the coupled hands.

Though the video is intended for “seniors”, any fitness enthusiast may use the method. It was designed for anyone wishing to exercise without hand weights for whatever reason. Using this method, it is easily possible for even well conditioned athletes to do enough work to obtain a whole body aerobic effect as long as all four limbs are engaged in some fashion in a steady movement. Adding speed, pressure to the hand clasp, adding self-imposed tension in other areas of the body apart from the handclasp, or some combination of all these will ensure that the person exercising with this method is able to raise their heart rate into the “aerobic training range”.

Like all of Schwartz’ exercise protocols, the cardinal rule is to engage as much muscle tissue from as many body sectors as possible throughout the movement. This minimizes the stress on any one muscle group, reduces overall soreness after exercise, and processes the most oxygen in the quickest amount of time to mimic the cross country skiers who were his original inspiration.

So was this “isometrics”? Or “dynamic tension”? Or something else? That will be explored in a future article!

 

What is IsoTonoMetrics – Via the “Way Back Machine”

What is IsoTonoMetrics – Via the “Way Back Machine”

What exactly are “Isotonometrics”?

Basically they are Dr.Schwartz’ combination of “Isotonics” and “Isometrics” in one movement… a “moving isometric” or what some call “isomotion” today…

The “isometric resistance” was produced by a variety of “handclasps” where one arm resists the other through pushing or pulling in varying directions. Unlike traditional isometrics or “dynamic tension”, the arm movements were incorporated into larger body movements to activate as much muscle simultaneously as possible.  Body twists, knee dips, waist bends, lunges, etc where mixed with hand resistance moves.

It was not only the arms that were involved …

Dr. Schwartz also envisioned hand to leg resistance. One move mentioned in a patent application for this method mentions sitting on the floor in a knees up position. The hands/arms can then be used to provide resistance to the knees as they flex outward or inward working first the outer thigh muscles then the inner thigh muscles.

However accomplished, the motion followed the doctor’s usual principles… of activating as many body parts simultaneously as possible and not letting the upper body be neglected during “aerobic” exercise. Using his methods, “isotonometrics” could produce aerobic effects equal to his other exercise protocols.

The extended quotation below explains the concept in Dr. Schwartz’ own words as they appeared on the now defunct “panaerobics.com” website.

(There is a site by that name, but it is not Dr. Schwartz’ site any longer!)

This quote was accessed by way of the internet archive called the “WayBack Machine”

ISOtonometrics is not just exercise for you, ISO is YOU!

    Most popular exercise these days involves apparatus of some kind. Others offer a linear approach to fitness; get your “aerobics” at one time, focus on “body-sculpting,” strength work, or other fitness factors at another. Sound familiar? Not with ISO!

    Better prepare yourself for some quantum, perhaps heretical leaps! ISO is an exercise discipline that galvanizes most every bone, muscle, tendon, ligament and joint you’d care to include, well orchestrated with an increasingly effective heart action. All this can be accomplished with no hardware outside the very body whose function and structure you’re out to preserve, enhance and gussy up to look like you want it to. As a whole-body exerciser, your Isotonometric ‘gym’ is always located precisely where you happened to be! Once that sense of ‘autonomy’ is acquired you’re home free!

    Even though ISO developed into an exercise system ideal for all you dancers, athletes, weight-loss-seekers, casual or obsessive exercisers, it began as a personal exploration. ISO evolved from exploration a system I developed in the 1980’s – Heavyhands. When I began my late-career leap into the exercise field – and the eventual development of Panaerobics and Heavyhands – I had several objectives in mind. I wanted my ‘strategy’ to be novel, simple, relatively inexpensive, utterly convenient, able to bring the exerciser all or almost all exercise can confer. Heavyhands did all that while including easy to use equipment that served as a catalyst for gaining the basic exercise benefits-and maybe a few more-simultaneously.

    Seems the word “simultaneous” was key to my system. Lots of muscle groups trained simultaneously; lots of fitness factors, i.e., strength, endurance, flexibility, balance and skill, also gained during the same session; and of course I wanted exercise that fulfilled the fundamental fitness requirements, all while making for better performance in relation to work and recreation-you guessed it-simultaneously! (The “S” Factor)

    In short, I wanted this exercise to be at once the very best and the most diverse available, acquired by dint of the most convenient, yet varied, tactics I could conjure. Heavyhands provides a unique brand of fitness.

    Important to me, while I was at it, was making it fun. In my first book, “Heavyhands: the Ultimate Exercise System”, a primer teaching a hand weight-assisted whole body exercise system, I simply ducked the fun issue. That’s because the physician/psychiatrist part of me was getting more excited about the varied and growing list of measurable benefits of exercise as well as the well-documented added risk that came with being sedentary. Fun was okay, even pure wonderful, maybe for many a it is motivational must. But twenty years ago, I didn’t want to leave people with the impression that the down and dirty benefits weren’t good enough to be worth the toil – even if the process wasn’t pure pleasure!

    A few years ago experts began suggesting that easy-does-it where it comes to exercise. Some went so far as to advise those who wanted to lose weight to work out at low levels of intensity. That advice was likely based on the fact that low intensity workouts were consist with metabolic activity that favors fat utilization. That argument never did convince me that low-intensity was the best fat-loss, weight-loss route because it avoided the speed at which calories of heat are expended!

    I mention that trend and research because over two decades of exploration in exercise and movement adventure resulted in the discovery of Isotonometrics. ISO blends two exercise functions: isotonics and isometrics …. ISO-T allows you to

        select any intensity you prefer by one of many routes (without fussing with various bits of equipment) and

        to enjoy max control of intensity,

        practice heart training,

        gain flexibility,

        do strength work,

        focus on stamina and last but hardly least,

        gain skill while having fun!

“Isotonometrics”, then is Dr. Schwartz’ term for his method of “simultaneous” exercising of as much muscle as possible using only the resources of one’s own body without reference to equipment – even his own brainchild the “Heavyhands”!